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March 13, 2006

Comments

Bill

As an employee of a major US corporation involved in manufacturing, I see first hand this fast changing, unpredictable world (global economy). Someone needs to get the ISO 9000 folks on-board that the current requirements for continuing certification are too restrictive in this rapidly changing world. Are the US customers of China's low-cost manufacturing economy demanding ISO 9000 certification? NO, and there must be a message here.

Makio Yamazaki

Irving-san,

MIT Thomas Malone professor said "Organization" would be
changing into the adjustment and the upbringing-movement from the top-down management.
In other words, it looks like the dicision-making of bottom-up in the organization.
There would be possibilities of "the distributed organization" which is different
from the conventional organization.
The software tool of web 2.0 would have new business styles
that would be similar to "Siriawase" or "Kaizen"(TOYOTA), I mean.

vinnie mirchandani

Irving, neat piece of work.

Hate to make this a left handed compliment, but the majority of what your customers spend their $ 90 billion on IBM is not really innovation - it is expensive maintenance on old software, it's upgrades to old mainframes, it is outsourcing contracts at pricing 2-3 years ago - "Utility" spend.

Be nice to see IBM slash those prices amd free up more budgets for your customers to spend on innovation. Hopefully your own solutions for telemetry, predective analytics, web services - but high payback for low investment as new economics coming out of the Valley are promising.

Without you and EDS and Oracle and others slashing your pricing for older products, all this innovation talk will be academic. Enterprises cannot afford innovation because of ossified utility, "entitlement" spend.

Ian Hughes

The exciting thing for me was to see in the GIO real consideration of the rise of the massively mulitplayer online games and they social impact.

Whilst probably being considered the wrong side of the generational barrier I have evolved with the games industry.

The incredible change that has been made by the connectivity, the social networks that form in these environments and the potential to collaborate are often discarded by the perception that games are bad.

In some ways as a gamer I should not care that more people do not understand it, that way its 'my gang'. After all if I was a teenager now this could be considered a passing fad. However, its not. The scope for interaction, community and productivity, once you strip away the literal and actual noise of the machine guns, is huge.

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