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October 03, 2005

Comments

Aaron

Dead on!!! The United States is losing its competitive edge. We have placed to much emphasis on being the investment banker or the star football player. It is time that we make the smart kid the ideal. "You want to be rich, kid? Who is the richest man in the world? Yeap, King Geek himself - Bill Gates."

Jeffrey Allen Miller

I couldn't agree with you more Irving.

Whether or not a well-rounded engineering education will shift in time to advance IBM is yet to be seen, and it is a mistake to wait. If such training is successful four more years will pass before these students graduate. As a communicator at IBM for 9 years, I presented "that" unique talent of bridging the gap between engineer and upper management. Such communication requires full comprehension of technical skills, requirements, and products in dealing with the engineer; and full comprehension of budget needs, internal politics, company direction, and customer requirements to communicate with management. Making sense between the two requires clever people skills that no university education offers. But do not forget to warn "key talent," as I can attest, that along with retaining and seeking innovative employees at IBM there is a risk of organizational funding shift, which leads to layoff no matter how innovative the individual is to the whole.

Kent

While bridging Science and Technology to Business skills is important and a need...of a more pressing matter is just getting kids focused on fundamental math and science so they will have a chance at bridging to business. As a volunteer for many years with National Engineering Week I can relate first hand the dearth of fundamental levels of knowledge and interest in math/scinece at the 8th grade level. Even more pathetic among the girls.

The digital world will continue to liquify the supply of technical talent and it will easily go to where the need is present...regardless of man-made borders.

Regards,

Eddie

Irving,

Another problem particularly in America is the old model of education which can be summarized: "Go to college, get your degree, and you're set for the rest of your life." Not so anymore. Furthermore, with so much specialization taking place, it becomes much harder to be a generalist (or perhaps a granular generalist). Specialization, when you think about it, is actually quite easy since the person only has to focus on her/his specialty. And to top it off, the cost of education (at least in America) has sky rocketed the past several years. Why is this? Why are we making it more expensive for people to continue to educate themselves? I don't ever again want to hear Lou Dobbs fear mongering about "outsourcing America" ... maybe Lou should first go back to school and get another degree alongside his journalism background before he cackles further.

Mark Campbell

I would like to partner with IBM in bringing a new concept and a new way of producing equipment for the market place and marketing IBM Personal Computers> I believe that the market place is due for a revolutionary way to deploy and deliver hardware to the planet.

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